SECTION 10 – TIME-OUT RULES

SECTION 10 – TIME-OUT RULES

 

  1. A. Standard Time-Out. A player or team is entitled to two time-outs for 11- or 15-point games and three time-outs for a 21-point game.

10.A.1. Each time-out period may last up to 1 minute.

10.A.2. Play must be resumed at 1 minute or when all players are ready to resume play, whichever occurs first, unless another time-out is called by either side. Rule 10.A.5 procedures will be followed to resume play during a standard time-out.

10.A.3.  New 2021  If a team has any remaining time-outs, any player on that team may call a time-out before the next serve occurs.

Time-outs may not be called once the referee has called the score and the server has begun the service motion.

Reason: To maintain the goal of making all timing issues having a consistent point-in-time with the serve of the ball. This gives 2 audible signals for the referee to make a determination; the verbal “time-out” call and the “pop” of the ball on the paddle. Also, this change is part of the multiple rule changes moving all timing issues to a consistent point in time; before the next serve occurs.

Scenario: the referee calls the score and is waiting for the server to serve. Just before the server hits the ball, the referee hears the initial “T” sound of the words “Time-out” called by the receiver. The server claims that the receiver had committed a fault by calling a time-out after the serve. the referee informs the server that she heard the “start” of the time-out call (the “T” sound) before she saw and heard the ball hit the paddle on the serve. the referee allows the time-out called by the receiver and follows procedures accordingly.

10.A.4.  New 2021: Before the serve occurs, if a team calls a time-out while having no time-outs remaining, no penalty shall be called.

There is no penalty for calling a time-out when none is available if all other time-out rules are complied with.

Reason: To maintain the goal of making all timing issues having a consistent point-in-time with the serve of the ball.

Scenario A: The receiving team is out of time-outs. After the score is called but before the serve occurs, the receiver calls, “Time-out”. the referee informs the receiving team that they have no more time-outs and says she will recall the score. the referee will not give a 15-second warning in this situation. The Intent: To not punish a team who forgets how many remaining time-outs they have (as long as they don’t repeatedly call time-outs) but also to not allow “extra” time before play is restarted. This is the reason the referee should “quickly” get play started as soon as possible.

Scenario B: Team A is out of time-outs and is receiving serve. The incorrect receiver is setup to receive the serve. the referee calls the (correct) score and the server startstheir service motion. Before the serve occurs, the receiver yells, “Time-out”. While the referee is informing Team A that they have no time-outs remaining, Team A changes to the correct receiver. Team B then complains to the referee that since Team A had no time-outs remaining, this “pause” gave them time to reposition unfairly. the referee should NOT call a fault on Team A. Note: Players may ask position questions before the serve without an associated penalty (unless it gets excessive). Players are also not penalized for calling a time-out when they have none remaining. In this scenario, Team A might have realized they were in the wrong position and not have remembered that they were 1) out of time-outs, or 2) could have asked the referee about their correct position. Neither of these 2 actions are faultable. So, in effect, calling a time-out (when none were available) could have been accomplished by asking for the correct position. Since both of these actions are not faultable, the referee should not call a fault in this scenario.

10.A.5.  the referee will give the players a warning when there are 15 seconds remaining. At the end of the time-out, the referee will call “time in” and announce the score to begin the 10-second count even if all players are not on the court or not ready to play. If the server does not serve within 10 seconds after the score is called, and no additional time-outs are called or available, a fault will be called.

  1. B. Medical Time-Out. A player needing medical attention during a match should request a medical time-out from the referee. Once the medical time-out has been requested, the following guidelines shall be used:

10.B.1.   the referee shall immediately summon on-site medical personnel, or the Tournament Director if no medical personnel are present, to assess the situation and render appropriate first aid.

10.B.1.a. When medical personnel or the Tournament Director arrive, the referee shall start the 15-minute timer.

10.B.2.   If medical personnel, or the Tournament Director if no medical personnel are present, determine that a valid medical condition exists, then that player will be allowed no more than 15 minutes for the medical time-out.

10.B.2.a. The time-out must be continuous and may be up to 15 minutes. If the player uses fewer than 15 minutes, the remaining time is lost and no additional medical time will be available to the player during the match

10.B.2.b. If the player cannot resume play after the 15-minute medical time-out period, the match will be declared a retirement.

10.B.3.   If medical personnel, or the Tournament Director if no medical personnel are present, determine that no valid medical condition exists, the player or team will be charged a standard time-out, if available, and issued a technical warning.

10.B.3.a. If a standard time-out is not available, then a technical foul will be issued.

10.B.3.b. The medical time-out is no longer available to that player for that match.

10.B.3.c. New 2021: A player may be granted only one player- requested medical time-out per match.

A player may be granted only one medical time-out per match.

Reason: Rule 10.H.2.a allows the referee to request a medical staff assessment to determine a player’s ability to continue playing if, in the interest of player safety, the referee determines a potential medical condition exists. This change clarifies that medical staff may grant a referee-generated medical timeout, even if a player-requested medical timeout is granted earlier (or later) in the match for either the same or a different reason. The Intent: This rule gives the referees the ability to call for a medical assessment – without penalty to the players.

Scenario: A player has already called a medical timeout for a turned ankle in the first game. In the third game, the referee sees that the player is laboring and worried that they may have the beginning signs of heat stroke. When asked, the player said “no, they are ok”. the referee thinks the safe thing is to call for medical to make sure the player is ok to continue. The medical staff hydrates them and after 7 minutes says they are good to go. By any definition, the medical staff rendered medical attention. In this situation, the referee-generated medical time-out has no bearing on the match and no retirement should be imposed. Also, there is no question a Tournament Director appeal will result if the referee is forced to call for a retirement because the player has every right to say, “Hey, I didn’t ask for the medical time out; I was forced to take it by the referee.” That is counter to what this rule was designed to accomplish; give the referees the ability to call for a medical assessment – without penalty to the players – if the referee has reason to question the safety condition of a player.

10.B.4.   Rule 10.A.5 procedures will be followed to continue play after a medical time-out.

10.B.5.   Presence of blood. If blood is present on a player or on the court, play may not resume until the bleeding has been controlled and blood on clothing and the court has been removed.

10.B.5.a. Issues relating solely to blood cleanup or control will be considered a referee time- out.

10.B.5.b. Rule 10.A.5 procedures will be followed to continue play.

  1. C. New 2021: Continuous Play. Play should be continuous, although players are permitted to quickly take a drink or towel off in between rallies as long as, in the judgment of the referee, the flow of the game is not adversely impacted. the referee shall call the score when play should be resumed

    Hydration:
    Players are permitted to quickly hydrate in between points as long as, in the judgment of the referee, the flow of the game is not adversely impacted. the referee shall call the score when play should be resumed.Reason: This change is to further remove any hold-over effect of the 2019 Hydration Breaks and to allow a normal amount of time in between rallies for quick drinks and to towel off. This also completely removes any form of the word hydrate from the rulebook. The Intent: For the referee to allow quick breaks that do not impact the flow of the game. It is within the referee’s control to get the players back to playing in a timely manner.Scenario A: In a men’s doubles match, a player asks for a quick drink. the referee allows the quick break. When the referee determined the break should be completed, the referee says, “Let’s play gentlemen.” The players return to play and the game proceeds normally.Scenario B: Same as Scenario A above, except that after the referee says, “Let’s play gentlemen”, the players do not make their way back to the court. the referee loudly calls the score and starts the 10-second count. The players rush back to the court to continue on with the game.10. D. Equipment Time-Outs. Players are expected to keep all apparel and equipment in good playable condition and are expected to use regular time-outs and time between games for adjustments and replacement of equipment. If a player or team is out of time-outs and the referee determines that an equipment change or adjustment is necessary for fair and safe continuation of the match, the referee may award an equipment time-out not to exceed 2 minutes. Rule 10.A.5 procedures will be followed to resume play during an equipment time-out.

10.D.1.  apparel and equipment adjustments that can be accomplished quickly are allowed between rallies (e.g., tying shoelaces, cleaning glasses, adjusting hat).

  1. E. Time Between Games. The period between games in a match shall not exceed 2 minutes. Rule 10.A.5 procedures will be followed to resume play.

10.E.1. New 2021:  In between games of a match, players may take one or both of their upcoming game’s timeouts. The players must inform the referee, or their opponents if there is no referee. If a team returns to play before one (or both) requested time-outs have started, the team retains the time-out(s) for the upcoming game. The normal two minutes in between games will be used before any team- allotted timeouts. Rule 10.A.5 procedures will be followed to continue play.

Reason: This rule will allow players who, for whatever reason, need to take the timeout(s) without having to be on or near the court. This most often occurs when one or both players need a bathroom break in between games. The players must inform the referee or their opponents of their intent to take timeouts before they leave the court area. If one or more players are not back in time, then the provisions of Rule 10.A.5 apply.

Scenario A: After game 1, Team A informs the referee that they may need to take one, or possibly both, of their upcoming time-outs if they are not back before the 2-minute break has completed. the referee informs the opponents that Team A is using one, or possibly both, of their time-outs after the 2-minute break. After the 2-minute game break is completed, the referee informs Team B that she is now starting the 1-minute time-out procedure and notes this on the scoresheet. After the 2-minute game break has completed, the referee starts the timer for Team A’s first time-out. Team A returns after 20 seconds has been used for their first time-out. the referee informs all players that Team A now has 1 time-out remaining for the upcoming game. the referee says, “Game 2, Time-in” and calls the score to start the game.

Scenario B: Same as scenario A, except that Team A does NOT return after both time-out times have expired. Without Team A having returned to the court, the referee calls, “Game 2, Time-in” and calls the score. Team B is the serving team and before the 10-seconds has elapsed, they serve to an empty receiving court and the referee calls “Point”. This continues until Team A returns to the court to continue play.

Scenario C: Same as Scenario B except that Team A is the serving team and does not return after both time-outs have expired. the referee calls “Game 2, Time-in” and calls the score. When the 10-second count expires, the referee calls “Side out” and Team B will now serve to start the rally.

  1. F. Time Between Matches. The standard time between matches shall be 10 minutes. If all players are ready to play prior to 10 minutes, the match may be called early.

10.F.1.  In a championship match with a tie-breaker match: If the winner of the loser’s bracket defeats the winner of the winner’s bracket, then a tie-breaker match to 15 points must be played. Maximum time between the championship match and the tie- breaker match is 10 minutes. Rule 10.A.5 procedures will be followed to begin play for the tie-breaker match.

  1. G. Suspended Games. A game suspended due to extenuating circumstances shall be resumed with the same server, score, and remaining time-outs as when interrupted.

 

  1. H. Other Time-Out Rules.

10.H.1. New 2021: Before A Match or Between Games: Neither medical nor regular time-outs may be taken before a match starts. A match cannot begin until all players are present and the starting score is called. Time-out(s) may be used at the start of the second or third game in a two-out-of-three game match

Before A Match or Game: no time-outs may be taken before a match starts. Time-out(s) may be used at the start of the second or third game in a two-out-of-three game match.

Reason: This reasserts that a match may not start until all players are present and it further clarifies that neither medical nor regular time-outs may be taken before the match starts.

Scenario: During the warm-up time, a Team A player says his partner is “detained” and that they may need to take a time-out before the match starts. the referee says she cannot grant this request and they need to follow the rules on time limits when starting a match and that all players must be present to start the match. The Team A player goes and gets the previously detained partner and everyone is there on time to start the match. the referee starts game one by calling, “Game one, time-in, 0-0-2” During the middle of the score calling, a Team A player calls for a time-out and the referee grants the time-out accordingly. The partner is still not back when the referee calls, “Time-in, 0-0-2” and again, during the middle of the score calling, the Team A player calls for their 2nd time-out. the referee grants the 2nd time-out accordingly.

10.H.2.  Extenuating Circumstances: the referee may call a referee time-out to address extenuating circumstances that may require an extended interruption of play.

10.H.2.a. In the interest of overall safety, if the referee determines a potential medical situation exists, (for example, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, etc.) the referee is authorized to call a referee time-out and summon medical personnel or the Tournament Director. If determined to be a valid medical situation requiring treatment, the referee will charge a medical time-out to the affected player and proceed in accordance with Rule 10.B. If the player did not require treatment, play resumes and no time-out is charged to the player. If the player has previously used, or been charged a medical timeout, the referee will call a referee time-out and summon medical personnel or the Tournament Director to determine if the player may resume play.

10.H.2.b. Active bleeding shall be addressed in accordance with Rule 10.B.5.

10.H.2.c. Foreign substances on the court, such as debris, water or other fluids, shall be removed or cleaned up.

10.H.2.d. Rule 10.A.5 procedures shall be used to resume play.

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